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10 Ways To Reduce Customer Churn Rate

Lowering churn is a top priority for many businesses regardless of their industry. Churn is the last thing you want among many key performance indicators (KPI). A higher churn rate means more customers drop off

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Economic Order Quantity: How to Calculate It and What It Means

Inventory-heavy businesses constantly look at ways to optimize their inventory balances. If a company purchases too much stock, it ties up too much cash into inventory and ends up experiencing high storage costs. If the company buys too little, on the other hand, it won’t be able to meet customers’ or production needs. The Economic Order Quantity (EOQ) is a calculation that determines the maximum amount of a product or service that a company should order at one time to minimize costs. In simpler terms, EOQ helps us find the ‘sweet spot’ of how much and how often to order. The EOQ considers ordering costs, inventory carrying costs, and lead time. The goal is achieving the lowest possible cost while maintaining an adequate inventory level. This article will explore the Economic Order Quantity model, how to run the calculation, and what it means for your business. Knowing this, you can

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Perpetual Inventory System: How Does It Work?

The Perpetual Inventory System is a method of accounting for the number and value of goods on hand at any time. It helps with the vital task of keeping track of inventory levels so that we can timely replace goods when they run out and to ensure that we record the correct amount of revenue and the corresponding cost of sales (cost of goods sold). The Perpetual Inventory System is crucial because it allows companies to keep track of their inventory levels and ensure they are always stocked with the necessary goods. How Does the Perpetual Inventory System Work Under the Perpetual Inventory system, businesses keep a running tally of the number of goods they have on hand at all times. This information is typically tracked using software designed specifically for this purpose. The software records sales and purchases as they happen via point-of-sale (POS) and enterprise asset management systems.

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Days Working Capital: What It Is and How To Track It

Businesses use financial metrics to measure their performance over time. One such metric is Days Working Capital (DWC) which shows us the number of days the company takes to convert working capital into sales revenue. Many investors use DWC as a liquidity indicator to track working capital management efficiency. In this article, we explore some factors that can influence DWC. We will also look at how to calculate Days Working Capital and how to analyze the metric. What is Days Working Capital? Days Working Capital (DWC) is a good indicator of whether or not a company can cover its short-term expenses. When analyzing DWC, it is essential to remember that it varies significantly between companies and industries. Usually, it makes more sense to analyze the ratio and see how the company manages it over time. The higher the metric, the longer it takes the company to turn working capital into

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The Residual Income Valuation Model: How to Use It

The Residual Income Model is a popular option for valuing businesses. The model assumes that the value of a company equals the present value of all future residual incomes, discounted at the cost of equity. This model uses the principle of residual income, which is an estimation of the free cash flow available to the owners of a business after investors’ return requirements have been satisfied (usually via dividends). This can be a more accurate way to value a company than other methods, such as asset- or earnings-based methods. In this article, we will explain the residual income valuation model and how to use it to value a business. We will also look at the Residual Income Valuation Model template on Magnimetrics.com and how you can easily set it up and use it to value any company. What is the Residual Income Model? The residual income model is based on

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What is Standard Costing and How Does It Work

Standard Cost Accounting (or Standard Costing) is a form of cost accounting that uses predetermined costs for materials, labor, and overhead to estimate the costs of goods or services. Standard costing is typically used in manufacturing to determine the cost of products based on standard rates for materials, labor, and overhead. Companies use standard costing to set target costs for production and then compare actual production costs to the target costs. This comparison helps companies identify variances they need to address to improve their production processes. How to calculate Standard Cost We can calculate the standard cost of a product or service by adding the typical costs of direct materials, direct labor, and overhead. The standard cost of direct materials is the average cost of the raw materials used to produce a product or service. For direct labor, it is the average hourly wage rate for the workers who make

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Loan Calculator: What Is It And How Can It Help Your Business?

To make an informed decision about a loan, business owners and managers must understand how much their monthly payments will be. A loan calculator can help you do just that. You can get a good idea of your monthly payments by inputting the principal amount of the loan, the interest rate, and the number of months in the repayment period. This can help you budget for your loan and avoid any surprises down the road. What is a loan calculator, and how does it work? A loan calculator is a simple tool that managers can use to estimate how much a loan will cost. To use a loan calculator, you enter the loan amount, interest rate, and term into the calculator. It will then calculate the monthly payment for the loan. A loan calculator can be a valuable tool for businesses considering a loan. By entering different loan amounts, interest

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5 Tips for Better Financial Models in Excel

“If you cannot explain it simply, you don’t understand it well enough.” Albert Einstein It’s a simple sentence, but it carries a lot of truth. A lack of simplicity is often why models are so complicated that they are almost useless. And I’m not just talking about Excel workbooks full of hard-to-track VLOOKUPs, convoluted named ranges, and data tables. Better financial models start with better conceptualizations and more straightforward ways of representing the issues you are trying to analyze and solve. Read ahead for 5 great tips on how to build better financial models in Excel! Tip 1: Start with outlining the flow of your financial model Before you even open Excel, spend some time outlining the flow of your model. What are you trying to accomplish? Who is it for, and how will it be used? Which data sources will be required? It’s essential to set goals before you

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Getting Started with the Stock Market: What Every Investor Needs to Know

The stock market is a complex system with which even the most experienced investors can struggle. However, there are a few key concepts that every investor should be aware of to make informed decisions about their money. In this article, we will discuss some of these critical concepts. We are talking about a collection of markets where stocks (pieces of ownership in businesses) are traded between investors. It usually refers to exchanges where stocks and other securities are bought and sold. The stock market is a vital part of a free-market economy, as it provides a place for investors to buy and sell shares in public companies. The stock market plays several crucial roles in the economy, including price discovery and efficient capital allocation. In the United States, the stock market is regulated by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and local regulatory bodies. The US stock market has been

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10 Ways To Reduce Customer Churn Rate

Lowering churn is a top priority for many businesses regardless of their industry. Churn is the last thing you want among many key performance indicators (KPI). A higher churn rate means more customers drop off from your services. With that said, how do you reduce customer churn rate? How do you generate new demand for your products and services? Here are 10 things to consider that can help your business. 1. Connect With Your Best Customers Businesses that want to reduce churn will identify a pool of customers most likely to cancel and focus on keeping them. While this is a reasonable effort, it’s best to understand that you can’t keep everyone. It may even be detrimental for you to spend too much on all your customers trying to churn. The best move is not to pursue everyone but instead find your best customers who are close to churning and

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How to Create Debt Amortization Schedules in Excel

A Debt Amortization Schedule outlines how a company will be settling its debt and interest over time. Businesses often rely on debt capital (loans) to support their growth strategy and expansions. In general, there are two types of loans you would generally see on a company’s balance sheet: Working capital loans (overdrafts) to support short-term inventory and working capital needs; Investment loans to support long-term strategic endeavors (installing a new assembly line or purchasing new equipment). Working capital loans would sit in the short-term liabilities on the balance sheet, while investment loans sit on the long-term liabilities. While overdrafts are usually due within a year, and most companies repay them in a single installment, investment loans typically come attached to a strict repayment schedule. Most commonly, these have a fixed monthly installment. Initially, more of the installment covers interest on the outstanding amount, while a smaller portion of the payment

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